What Jobs Are Toughest on the Knees?

What Jobs Are Toughest on the Knees?

Joint replacements for knee osteoarthritis are becoming more common, and now researchers have identified jobs that may lead to one.

Based on a review of 71 studies that included nearly one million workers, the riskiest occupations include agriculture, construction, mining, service jobs and housekeeping. And jobs that demand excessive kneeling, squatting, standing, lifting and climbing stairs all increase your odds.

A team of researchers from the University of Sydney in Australia, and the Universities of Oxford and Southampton in the United Kingdom found that:

  • Carpenters, bricklayers and floor installers have roughly three times the risk for knee osteoarthritis, compared with sedentary workers.
  • Farm workers have 64% higher odds for the condition, slightly higher than the 63% for builders and construction workers.
  • Housekeeping also carries a risk — with unpaid houseworkers facing up to 93% increased odds for knee osteoarthritis.
  • Some jobs were kinder to the knees, however. Workers in commerce, forestry, fishing, machinists, plumbers, electricians, technicians and postal workers did not have a statistically significant risk for knee osteoarthritis, the study found.

“Knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of loss of work and disability worldwide and can necessitate invasive surgery including total knee replacement, so preventing occupational hazards is critical,” senior study author Dr. David Hunter said in a news release from the University of Sydney, where he leads the Institute of Bone and Joint Research.

Osteoarthritis develops as cartilage deteriorates and bone comes into contact with bone, causing pain and swelling, and limiting function, which affects lifestyle. It can follow an injury, but most of the time the cause is unknown, according to a New York orthopedic surgeon.

“There is a genetic component, but there’s also a lifestyle component,” said Dr. Jeffrey Schildhorn of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, who reviewed the findings. One of the biggest risk factors is being overweight or obese.

“I’ve seen arthritis in every walk of life,” he said.

Osteoarthritis is a disease of aging, so it’s not surprising that more people are suffering from it and that the number of joint replacements is soaring, because people are living longer, Schildhorn said. But, he added, there is no miracle cure.

“The thing with arthritis that makes it difficult to deal with is that cartilage has no true regenerative ability,” he said, suggesting that the best way to prevent it is to eat well and watch your weight. Stretching and exercises like yoga will also help keep joints limber, Schildhorn added.

Treatment can include pain medications, and physical or behavioral therapy. But when these don’t work, a knee replacement may be in order.

“Osteoarthritis is mechanical wear and tear,” Schildhorn said. “Some people have more resilient cartilage than others.” If it is very soft and flaky, no treatment is going to work and it has nothing to do with a person’s lifestyle — or their job, he said.

But employers can help by providing physical therapy and teaching workers how to do their jobs with less stress on their knees, Schildhorn said.

The report was recently published in the journal Arthritis Care and Research.

More information

Learn more about knee osteoarthritis from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

SOURCES: Jeffrey Schildhorn, MD, orthopedic surgeon, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; University of Sydney, news release, July 8, 2020; Arthritis Care and Research, July 8, 2020

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Do I Have Arthritis?

Do I Have Arthritis?

How do you know if your joint symptoms mean you have arthritis? Only a health care professional can tell you for sure, but certain signs usually point to arthritis. There are four important warning signs that should prompt you to talk to a health care provider.

Warning Signs

1. Pain

Pain from arthritis can be constant or it may come and go. It may occur when at rest or while moving. Pain may be in one part of the body or in many different parts.

2. Swelling

Some types of arthritis cause the skin over the affected joint to become red and swollen, feeling warm to the touch. Swelling that lasts for three days or longer or occurs more than three times a month should prompt a visit to the doctor.

3. Stiffness

This is a classic arthritis symptom, especially when waking up in the morning or after sitting at a desk or riding in a car for a long time. Morning stiffness that lasts longer than an hour is good reason to suspect arthritis.

4. Difficulty moving a joint.

It shouldn’t be that hard or painful to get up from your favorite chair.

What To Do:

 

Your experience with these symptoms will help your doctor pin down the type and extent of arthritis. Before visiting the doctor, keep track of your symptoms for a few weeks, noting what is swollen and stiff, when, for how long and what helps ease the symptoms. Be sure to note other types of symptoms, even if they seem unrelated, such as fatigue or rash.   If you have a fever along with these symptoms you  may need to seek immediate medical care.

If the doctor suspects arthritis, they will perform physical tests to check the range of motion in your joints, asking you to move the joint back and forth. The doctor may also check passive range of motion by moving the joint for you. Any pain during a range of motion test is a possible symptom of arthritis. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history and may order lab tests as needed.

Most people start with their primary care physician, but it’s possible to be referred to doctors who specialize in treating arthritis and related conditions. Getting an accurate diagnosis is an important step to getting timely medical care for your condition.

How to Manage Your Osteoarthritis

How to Manage Your Osteoarthritis

(HealthDay News) — Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting about 31 million Americans, and is the leading cause of disability among adults.

Known as OA, it causes pain and other symptoms in joints, which can affect the ability to do everyday tasks. There’s no known cure, but there are treatments that can relieve pain and maintain joint function, according to a rheumatologist at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, N.C.

“Osteoarthritis is the thinning or wearing down of cartilage, which is the cushion between the separate bones in a joint,” Dr. Francis Luk said in a health system news release. “When your doctor says you have arthritis, most often they are referring to osteoarthritis.”

The main risk factors are aging, obesity, prior injury, repetitive stress on a joint and genetics. OA can occur in any joint, but the most common are knees, hips and hands.

“Symptoms vary from person to person but someone with osteoarthritis of the knee typically will have pain when they stand up from a seated position or when they’re walking, especially when going up and down stairs,” Luk said.

“With osteoarthritis of the hands, people typically experience pain when they do things that involve gripping — washing dishes, holding a wrench, opening a jar, things like that,” he added.

Treatments include over-the-counter drugs such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen sodium (Aleve).

Other nonprescription options include topical creams and gels, such as those containing trolamine salicylate (Aspercreme), and the use of heating pads and ice packs.

Assistive devices such as canes, shoe orthotics, jar openers and tools with thicker handles can help with routine tasks.

For more advanced cases of OA, there are prescription pills and creams and steroid injections. The last resort is joint replacement surgery, especially of knees and hips.

“We always try to delay turning to surgery for as long as we can,” Luk said. “However, if you get to a point where you can’t walk from your living room chair to the bedroom, it would be a good idea to see an orthopedic surgeon.”

And, remember, two of the best ways to combat OA are maintaining a normal weight and getting regular exercise, he said.

“I tell people to do as much as they can tolerate until they have some pain and then rest,” Luk said. “I never recommend completely stopping activities, because the downside of inactivity is worse than osteoarthritis.”

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on osteoarthritis.

SOURCE: Wake Forest Baptist Health System, news release, Oct. 10, 2019

Copyright ©2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
How to Manage Your Osteoarthritis

How to Manage Your Osteoarthritis

(HealthDay News) — Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting about 31 million Americans, and is the leading cause of disability among adults.

Known as OA, it causes pain and other symptoms in joints, which can affect the ability to do everyday tasks. There’s no known cure, but there are treatments that can relieve pain and maintain joint function, according to a rheumatologist at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, N.C.

“Osteoarthritis is the thinning or wearing down of cartilage, which is the cushion between the separate bones in a joint,” Dr. Francis Luk said in a health system news release. “When your doctor says you have arthritis, most often they are referring to osteoarthritis.”

The main risk factors are aging, obesity, prior injury, repetitive stress on a joint and genetics. OA can occur in any joint, but the most common are knees, hips and hands.

“Symptoms vary from person to person but someone with osteoarthritis of the knee typically will have pain when they stand up from a seated position or when they’re walking, especially when going up and down stairs,” Luk said.

“With osteoarthritis of the hands, people typically experience pain when they do things that involve gripping — washing dishes, holding a wrench, opening a jar, things like that,” he added.

Treatments include over-the-counter drugs such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen sodium (Aleve).

Other nonprescription options include topical creams and gels, such as those containing trolamine salicylate (Aspercreme), and the use of heating pads and ice packs.

Assistive devices such as canes, shoe orthotics, jar openers and tools with thicker handles can help with routine tasks.

For more advanced cases of OA, there are prescription pills and creams and steroid injections. The last resort is joint replacement surgery, especially of knees and hips.

“We always try to delay turning to surgery for as long as we can,” Luk said. “However, if you get to a point where you can’t walk from your living room chair to the bedroom, it would be a good idea to see an orthopedic surgeon.”

And, remember, two of the best ways to combat OA are maintaining a normal weight and getting regular exercise, he said.

“I tell people to do as much as they can tolerate until they have some pain and then rest,” Luk said. “I never recommend completely stopping activities, because the downside of inactivity is worse than osteoarthritis.”

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on osteoarthritis.

SOURCE: Wake Forest Baptist Health System, news release, Oct. 10, 2019

Copyright ©2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Your Noisy Knees May Be Trying to Tell You Something

Your Noisy Knees May Be Trying to Tell You Something

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Ever hear your joints clicking, creaking or crunching? Now, researchers say a new technique that listens closely to knees may help doctors diagnose and monitor osteoarthritis.

In the new study, researchers attached small microphones to participants’ knees, which allowed them to listen for high-frequency sounds as the person repeatedly stood up and sat down again.

Computer analysis of the sounds then provided information about the health of the knee, the study authors explained.

This study is the first to assess this technique in a large number of people with knee osteoarthritis. It was found to distinguish between healthy knees and those afflicted by this “wear-and-tear” form of arthritis.

The findings move the technique a step closer to use by doctors and in research, according to the report published Oct. 16 in the journal PLOS ONE.

“This work is very exciting because it involves scientists and clinicians working together as a team to develop an entirely new approach,” said project leader John Goodacre. He’s an emeritus professor at Lancaster University, in the United Kingdom.

“Potentially, this could transform ways in which knee osteoarthritis is managed. It will enable better diagnosis, and will enable treatments to be tailored more precisely according to individual knee condition. It will also enable faster, bigger and better clinical trials of new treatments,” Goodacre said in a university news release.

The next step for researchers is to develop a non-invasive portable device that health care providers could use to assess whether patients’ knees are changing or are responding to treatment for osteoarthritis.

This technique could provide a quicker, cheaper, more convenient and more accurate assessment than current methods, the study authors said.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on osteoarthritis.

SOURCE: Lancaster University, news release, Oct. 16, 2019

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Health Tip: Managing Arthritis of the Hands

Health Tip: Managing Arthritis of the Hands

(HealthDay News) — Arthritis is a collection of joint diseases that affect more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the United States.

The joint pain, swelling or stiffness that may come with arthritis can be debilitating, says the Arthritis Foundation.

To manage arthritis of the hands, the foundation suggests:

  • Use cold packs to numb the joints and reduce swelling.
  • For significant inflammation, heat packs may provide relief.
  • Immobilize the hand with a splint or brace overnight.
  • Use a grip or similar device if you have trouble grasping or holding things.
Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
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