Here’s what you need to know about the painful but treatable condition called adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder.

Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, is an inflammation of the shoulder capsule. This band of connective tissue encases the shoulder joint, so as inflammation progresses, patients experience a restricted range of motion along with extreme stiffness.

While the medical community has not yet been able to pinpoint the exact cause of frozen shoulder, there are a number of conditions that can contribute to its development. These include diabetes, thyroid disorders, and past surgeries on the shoulder or chest.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF FROZEN SHOULDER

Patients suffering from frozen shoulder generally experience moderate to severe pain, inflammation, stiffness, and a limited range of motion in the shoulder.

This condition normally cycles through three progressive stages. These are:

  • The “freezing” phase, where the patient experiences increasingly severe shoulder pain lasting from several weeks to nine months.
  • The “frozen” phase, where pain in the shoulder decreases but stiffness lingers, lasting from four to nine months.
  • The “thawing” phase, where pain continues to lessen and the range of motion in the shoulder slowly improves, lasting from five months to two years.
HOW TO PREVENT FROZEN SHOULDER

Frozen shoulder predominantly affects people in middle age, and it is possible to preemptively avoid this condition — especially if you’ve been diagnosed with any of the risk factors commonly associated with it, like diabetes or a thyroid disorder. The best possible prevention method is to steadily increase shoulder flexibility through stretching, including external rotation, forward flexion, and crossover arm motions.

HOW TO TREAT FROZEN SHOULDER

In many cases, conservative treatments can effectively ease shoulder pain and stiffness. These methods generally include a physical therapy regimen designed to restore shoulder motion and strengthen the surrounding muscles. Most patients will need to undergo a rehabilitation plan for approximately four to five months to ensure a complete recovery.

Sometimes, anti-inflammatories and corticosteroid injections are used to supplement physical therapy. If mobility issues continue, minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery can be utilized to break up and remove scar tissue that has built up in the shoulder, with full recovery occurring in as little as six weeks.

If you think you may be suffering from frozen shoulder, set up an appointment with an orthopedic specialist today. Backed by decades of experience in treating shoulder injuries, CompOrtho Specialists can work with you to develop a personalized recovery plan.  Dr. Main and Dr. Gershtenson are top-rated orthopedic surgeons in Southeastern Wisconsin who specializes in the shoulder.  Our team of specialists can help you through every step of your treatment, ensuring a quick and complete recovery.