Too Much or Too Little Weight May Worsen Rheumatoid Arthritis

Too Much or Too Little Weight May Worsen Rheumatoid Arthritis

Obesity may accelerate and amplify the crippling symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.

Conversely, the researchers also found that unexplained weight loss might also signal problems for these patients, because it could mean that they’re at greater risk for disability.

“While patients and rheumatologists may be focused mostly on disease activity, we should also consider this common condition [obesity], which can contribute to problems that are usually attributed to the arthritis itself,” said study author Dr. Joshua Baker.

“In addition, unintentional weight loss should alert us that the patient may be becoming frail and is at risk for developing new disability,” he added. Baker is an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition. It develops when immune cells that normally fight germs attack the lining of the joints, or cartilage. This causes the joints to swell and the surrounding bones, ligaments and muscles to gradually erode. Rheumatoid arthritis worsens over time, often leading to disability.

For the study, Baker and his colleagues looked at the effects of obesity on the progression of rheumatoid arthritis in just over 25,000 people with the disease.

The investigators found that the disease advanced more quickly among those who were very obese. This was true regardless of the level of inflammation in their joints.

In addition, people who were thin but lost weight without trying also became disabled more quickly.

The study was published April 30 in the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

“So, this study suggests that patients with rheumatoid arthritis and obesity would benefit from intentional weight loss through a comprehensive management strategy,” Baker said in a journal news release.”

“However, when we see that someone is losing weight without trying, it’s probably a poor prognostic sign, especially if they are already thin,” he added.

Although the study could not prove a cause-and-effect link, the researchers suggested that new treatments and strategies to help people maintain a healthy weight might help prevent disability among people with rheumatoid arthritis.

And, Baker’s team noted, the findings could help doctors recognize signs of frailty among their rheumatoid arthritis patients who may benefit from strength training and physical therapy.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about obesity and rheumatoid arthritis.

SOURCE: Arthritis Care & Research, news release, April 30, 2018

Obesity to Blame for Epidemic of Knee Dislocations, Complications

Obesity to Blame for Epidemic of Knee Dislocations, Complications

Need another reason to keep your weight under control?

Excess weight can cause dislocation of your knee and may even lead to a complication that results in amputation of your leg.

A new study attributes a surge in dislocated knees to the U.S. obesity epidemic.

“Obesity greatly increases the complications and costs of care,” said study lead author Dr. Joey Johnson, an orthopedic trauma fellow at Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School.

“As the rate of obesity increases, the rate of knee dislocations increases. The total number of patients who are obese is increasing, so we are seeing more of these problems,” Johnson explained.

Knee dislocations result from multiple torn ligaments. Vehicle crashes or contact sports, such as football, are common causes.

For the study, the researchers analyzed more than 19,000 knee dislocations nationwide between 2000 and 2012. Over that time, people who were obese or severely obese represented a growing share of knee dislocation patients — 19 percent in 2012, up from 8 percent in 2000.

Obesity is also linked to more severe knee dislocations, longer hospital stays and higher treatment costs, according to the study published recently in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.

And the chances that a knee dislocation would also injure the main artery behind the joint and down the leg were twice as high for obese patients than for those whose weight was normal, the findings showed. This severe complication of knee dislocation — known as a vascular injury — can lead to leg amputation if not treated, the study authors said.

Patients with a vascular injury averaged 15 days in the hospital, compared with about one week for other patients. Their average hospitalization costs were just over $131,000 and $60,000, respectively.

The study authors said doctors should be especially watchful for vascular injury in obese patients whose knees are dislocated.

“That subset of obese patients who come in with complaint of knee pain need to be carefully evaluated so as not to miss a potentially catastrophic vascular injury,” said study co-author Dr. Christopher Born, a professor of orthopedics at Brown.

Reducing obesity rates could help reverse the growing number of knee dislocations, the researchers suggested.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more on knee problems.

SOURCE: Brown University, news release, Nov. 3, 2017