ACL Surgery Preparation and Recovery

ACL Surgery Preparation and Recovery

Professional athletes’ speedy recoveries from injuries have nothing to do with superhuman abilities. Instead, it’s all about proper preparation and planning.

It’s no surprise that professional athletes tend to be in much better shape than those of us who don’t play sports for a living — but what might seem more puzzling is that they also seem to recover more rapidly from injuries. Think of D’Angelo Russell, the Brooklyn Nets’ star point guard. After suffering a knee injury in November, he underwent arthroscopic knee surgery and fully recovered in just over two months, returning to the court by the middle of January.

Such a speedy recovery isn’t evidence of superior physical fitness, however, so much as a clear strategy in the wake of an injury. Professional athletes have access to some of the best orthopedic specialist available — and these doctors, trainers, and therapists help them follow strict guidelines throughout the process of rehabilitation, ensuring that they can return to action as soon as possible.

While you might not have a dedicated team of doctors at your disposal, there are many steps you can take to enjoy a similarly quick recovery. ACL tears — a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, one of several ligaments that stabilize the knee — are a common injury affecting star basketball players and casual gym-goers alike. Here’s what you can learn from the professional athletes’ approach to ACL rehabilitation.

1. KEEP YOUR BODY HEALTHY

In order to help your body best respond to arthroscopic surgery, you need to stay healthy and hydrated. For at least a week before your surgery, be sure to drink plenty of water and eat a nutritious, wholesome diet rich in antioxidants, both of which can boost your body’s ability to heal.

2. STRETCH AND EXERCISE BEFORE SURGERY

Staying healthy requires more than just eating right, of course. Your preparation for surgery should include regular stretches and massages, which can strength the tissues surrounding the ACL and increase their flexibility. These measures ensure that the knee joint remains relaxed and enjoys proper circulation, both of which foster optimal surgical conditions.

3. DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS

Nobody expects an injury, so when these unfortunate events happen, you might not know what to expect. Athletes have a whole team on hand — ranging from surgeons to physical therapists — to guide them through the process, and while you might not have the same resources readily available, you should do your best to stay informed. Your doctor and surgeon are there to help you, so be sure to voice your concerns and ask any questions you may have.

4. FORMULATE AND WRITE DOWN THE RULES

When it comes to recovery, you can’t break the rules. A rehabilitation plan isn’t something you can come up with on the fly, so be sure to consult with your doctor, therapist, and surgeon to formulate a concrete plan centered around defined protocols and regular benchmarks to help you stay motivated and focused.

5. STAY STOCKED UP ON SUPPLIES

Proper recovery requires keeping plenty of tools on hand, such as ice packs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories. You may struggle to get out of the house while you recover from the procedure, so ensure that you have an ample supply of everything you might need before you undergo surgery.

6. MAINTAIN A POSITIVE MOOD

As a minimally invasive procedure, arthroscopic surgery is designed to shorten recovery timelines, but you’ll still need to spend some time resting immediately after surgery. Since you won’t be able to participate in many of your daily activities, try to have some projects at the ready to keep you happy and occupied. Maintaining a positive mood will help boost your morale, and ultimately assist in recovery.

If you’re considering arthroscopic surgery for an ACL tear, CompOrtho is ready to help. Our team of specialists has decades of combined experience in treating knee injuries, providing every patient with the care and attention they need from the initial diagnosis to the final follow-up. Call us today to schedule a consultation!

Spring is approaching, which comes sports & the rise of ACL injuries

Spring is approaching, which comes sports & the rise of ACL injuries

“The traumatic injuries are something that you can’t avoid in the nature of sports,” said Michael Hughes, Clinic Coordinator and lead Physical Therapist at Agape Physical Therapy of Gates. “A lot of kids will come from the winter and start their spring season, and they don’t have a good strengthening regimen when starting their specific sport. It can lead to some injuries if they don’t have the proper muscle training.”

Orthopedic surgeons at Strong Memorial Hospital are seeing similar trends. According to a hospital spokesperson, orthopedic sports medicine surgeon Mike Maloney, M.D., confirms that he’s seeing the same rate of increase in his practice. We’re told Maloney specializes in treating elite student athletes and says the following factors are causing the alarming increase in this injury:

• The increasing level of intensity in scholastic sports

• More kids specializing in one sport and doing year-round training in that sport

• Lack of emphasis on proper nutrition

• Lack of focus on preventive care – teaching kids how to get conditioned to be strong, and how to move to help prevent injury.

Jeff Bobzin can’t preach it enough to the youth soccer players he coaches in Gates.

“We encourage kids to drink a lot of water, eat right and exercise,” Bobzin said.

Boys between ages 10-14 make up more than half of the reported injuries in the study. Therapists at Agape say its important for parents and kids to map out a training plan to prevent serious body injuries.

Ligament Injuries to the Knee

Ligament Injuries to the Knee

What are knee ligaments?

There are 4 major ligaments in the knee. Ligaments are elastic bands of tissue that connect bones to each other and provide stability and strength to the joint. The 4 main ligaments in the knee connect the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (shin bone), and include:

Anatomy of the knee
Click image to enlarge
  • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The ligament, located in the center of the knee, that controls rotation and forward movement of the tibia (shin bone).
  • Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The ligament, located in the back of the knee, that controls backward movement of the tibia (shin bone).
  • Medial collateral ligament (MCL). The ligament that gives stability to the inner knee.
  • Lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The ligament that gives stability to the outer knee.

How are cruciate ligaments injured?

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common ligaments to be injured. The ACL is often stretched and/or torn during a sudden twisting motion (when the feet stay planted one way, but the knees turn the other way). Skiing, basketball, and football are sports that have a higher risk of ACL injuries.

The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is also a common ligament to become injured in the knee. However, the PCL injury usually occurs with sudden, direct impact, such as in a car accident or during a football tackle.

What are the symptoms of a cruciate ligament injury?

Often, a cruciate ligament injury does not cause pain. Instead, the person may hear a popping sound as the injury occurs, followed by the leg buckling when trying to stand on it, and swelling. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently.

The symptoms of a cruciate ligament injury may look like other conditions or medical problems. Always see your doctor for a diagnosis.

How are collateral ligaments injured?

The medial collateral ligament is injured more often than the lateral collateral ligament. Stretch and tear injuries to the collateral ligaments are usually caused by a blow to the outer side of the knee, such as when playing hockey or football.

What are the symptoms of a collateral ligament injury?

Similar to cruciate ligament injuries, an injury to the collateral ligament causes the knee to pop and buckle, causing pain and swelling.

The symptoms of a collateral ligament injury may look like other conditions or medical problems. Always see your doctor for a diagnosis.

How is a knee ligament injury diagnosed?

In addition to a complete medical history and physical exam, diagnostic procedures for a knee ligament injury may include:

  • X-ray. A diagnostic test that uses invisible electromagnetic energy beams to produce images of internal tissues, bones, and organs onto film to rule out an injury to bone instead of, or in addition to, a ligament injury.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A diagnostic procedure that uses a combination of large magnets, radiofrequencies, and a computer to produce detailed images of organs and structures within the body; can often determine damage or disease in bones and a surrounding ligament or muscle.
  • Arthroscopy. A minimally-invasive diagnostic and treatment procedure used for conditions of a joint. This procedure uses a small, lighted, optic tube (arthroscope) that is inserted into the joint through a small incision in the joint. Images of the inside of the joint are projected onto a screen; used to evaluate any degenerative and/or arthritic changes in the joint; to detect bone diseases and tumors; to determine the cause of bone pain and inflammation.

Treatment for knee ligament injuries

Treatment may include:

  • Medicaine such as ibuprofen
  • Muscle-strengthening exercises
  • Protective knee brace (for use during exercise)
  • Ice pack application (to reduce swelling)
  • Surgery