Health Tip: Change Poor Posture

Health Tip: Change Poor Posture

Health Tip: Change Poor Posture

(HealthDay News) — Everyone has back pain at some point, whether due to poor posture, heavy lifting, a spinal condition present a birth, or an exercise-related injury.

While other triggers for back pain may not be as easy to prevent, poor posture is a relatively easy fix.

Harvard Medical School suggests how:

  • By imagining good posture, you can help create it. Imagine a straight line passing through your body from ceiling to floor (the ears, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles line up vertically).
  • Sit up straight with hands resting on your thighs. Keep your shoulders down and your chin level. Slowly draw your shoulders back and squeeze your shoulder blades together. Hold for a count of five; relax. Repeat three or four times.
  • Stand facing a corner with your arms raised, hands flat against the walls, elbows at shoulder height. Place one foot ahead of the other. Bending your forward knee, exhale as you lean your body toward the corner. Keep your back straight and your chest and head up. Hold this position for about 30 seconds. Relax.
  • Raise your right arm to shoulder level in front of you and bend the arm at the elbow, keeping the forearm parallel to the floor. Grasp the right elbow with your left hand and gently pull it across your chest so you feel a stretch in the upper arm and shoulder on the right side. Hold for 20 seconds; relax both arms. Repeat three times on each side.
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Physical Therapy for Shoulder Pain

Physical Therapy for Shoulder Pain

Shoulder pain is a common symptom for athletes and office workers alike. These simple exercises can improve flexibility and prevent future injury.

The shoulder’s complex structure makes it susceptible to injury, especially from one-too-many many weightlifting exercises. Whatever the cause of your pain or discomfort, the healing process often involves physical therapy to stretch and strengthen the surrounding muscles.

Be sure to consult a doctor before beginning a physical therapy regimen, as shoulder pain can be a symptom of a variety of conditions, like impingement or a rotator cuff tear. The following exercises offer gentle stretching and light conditioning to get you on the road to recovery.

1. PENDULUM EXERCISE
The pendulum exercise can help you recover from a shoulder injury, as it encourages blood flow and develops your range of motion. To get started, stand near a table with your feet slightly more than shoulder width apart. Place the hand of your uninjured arm on the table, then bend over and let your injured arm dangle toward the floor. Shift your body weight in order to create movement in the arm: forward and back, side to side, or in a small circle. Do not engage your shoulder muscles, but let the arm swing freely.

Start with 30 seconds of motion, a few times per day. Over the next few weeks you can gradually increase to several minutes of movement. You can also do a variation of this exercise on a bed if leaning over is hard on your back or neck, though you may need someone else to set your arm in motion. As your recovery progresses, you may be able to use light dumbbells to further stretch the shoulder — but be careful not to engage the muscles and risk re-injury.

2. SCAPTIONS
This exercise targets the rotator cuff, building strength in the scapula and rhomboids to prevent and relieve pain. It can also help strengthen your back and improve your posture.

Stand with your feet below your shoulders, core engaged and knees at a slight angle. With a light dumbbell in each hand, palms inward, raise your arms out in front of you in a broad V shape. Then slowly draw your shoulder blades together. Be careful not to raise your arms above your shoulders. Hold this position momentarily, then lower. Repeat about ten times, for three sets.

3. EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL SHOULDER ROTATION
The rotator cuff muscles that allow for internal rotation are the supraspinatus and subscapularis. These let you draw your arm forward, with your palm facing in, and are commonly used in gym exercises and everyday life. Overuse causes these muscles to tighten, often leading to pain.

To begin strengthening the rotator cuff, you can practice a simple towel stretch. Grasp a towel or strap with your right hand and drape it over your right shoulder so it hangs down your back. Your right hand should be level with the back of your head, or lower toward the back of your neck if it’s comfortable. Turn your left arm behind your lower back with your palm facing behind you as you raise your left hand to meet and grasp the bottom end of the towel. Don’t force the stretch, but spend 15 to 30 seconds just at your point of flexibility. Try three repetitions on each side, and over time you will be able to bring your hands closer together at your back.

The external rotator muscles in the rotator cuff are the infraspinatus and teres minor. These typically get less training, which can create an imbalance and eventually lead to pain. To strengthen these muscles, use only one- or two-pound weights until you are able to easily add more, one pound at a time. Lie on your side, with your upper arm at a 90-degree angle, elbow against your side. Slowly rotate your forearm out and up, to your side, drawing your shoulder blades together until your palm faces forward. Hold for two seconds, then lower down. Repeat 10 times on each side.

4. SHOULDER RETRACTIONS
There are a number of exercises that involve shoulder retraction, and they all aim to correct a slumped posture. If your shoulder blades, or scapulae, are constantly hunched forward, it can affect how you use your shoulder joint, lift your arms, and stand. Poor posture can even affect the blood flow and nerves in your arms and hands, and make it harder to breathe by collapsing your chest. You should perform shoulder retraction stretches as much as possible to counteract these effects, and build up the muscles to help prevent shoulder pain.

To begin this exercise, stand straight, arms at your sides, with your shoulders relaxed. Pull your shoulder blades down and back, without arching your back. Hold this for 5-10 breaths, and repeat 3-5 times.

For a more targeted exercise, lie facedown on a mat, resting your forehead on a towel. Hold your arms straight out at your sides, palms down. Use your shoulder blades to lift your arms off the floor, holding this position for a few breaths.

EXERCISES TO AVOID
As you perform these exercises, keep in mind that shoulder pain can have many underlying causes, and without a doctor’s diagnosis you risk exacerbating the issue. Take your time when introducing new exercises into your routine to give your body time to adjust. To avoid further damage, be sure to start with no weight or very light weights for any strengthening activities.

You should also avoid exercises that are counterproductive to the healing process. Stay away from common gym exercises like dips, upright rows, overhead presses, and lat pull downs done behind the neck, which can put stress on the neck and shoulders.

If you’re suffering from shoulder pain, you may want to schedule an appointment with an orthopedic specialist. At CompOrtho, specialists will help identify any underlying conditions that may be causing you discomfort.

Low Back Pain? These Exercises May Help

Low Back Pain? These Exercises May Help

THURSDAY, Aug. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Low back pain is a common health complaint. And if it sidelines you for too long, it can lead to weight gain, a loss in your fitness level and keep you from doing things you love.

But not moving isn’t the answer — specific exercises can help you get back to everyday activities. If you’re under the care of an orthopedist or physical therapist, you may be given a series of exercises to do up to three times a day.

Here are three in particular that may help.

Tummy contractions. Lie on your back with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor hip-width apart, and your hands on your tummy below your ribcage. Tighten your abs — it should feel as though your ribcage is being pressed toward your back. Hold for five seconds, then relax. Repeat 10 times.

Knee-to-chest stretch. Begin in the same starting position, but for this exercise, place both hands on the back of your left thigh and gently pull the knee to your chest. Hold for 20 seconds, then relax. Repeat five times with the left leg, then switch to the right leg and repeat the entire sequence.

Body stretch sequence. Sit on a large exercise ball with knees bent at a 90-degree angle to the floor. Move your feet slightly out to the sides for balance. First, lift your left arm straight up over your head, then lower it and repeat with the right arm; alternate five times. Next, slowly raise and lower your left heel, then slowly raise and lower your right heel; alternate five times. Finally, raise your left arm overhead and your right heel off the floor at the same time, lower them and reverse, raising your right arm overhead and lifting your left heel off the floor; alternate five times.

Another type of exercise that may help is yoga. According to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, people who took a weekly class designed for those with low back pain were helped just as much as those who did traditional physical therapy, and needed less pain medication over time.

More information

The University of California, Berkeley, has detailed information on low back pain and more exercises that can help ease it.

Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Health Tip: Prevent Back Pain at Work

Health Tip: Prevent Back Pain at Work

(HealthDay News) — Chronic back pain makes it more difficult to do your job, whether you’re behind a desk or operating heavy machinery.

The Mayo Clinic suggests how to avoid back pain at work:

  • Maintain good posture.
  • Lift with your legs and tighten your core muscles, and avoid twisting.
  • When possible, use a lifting device.
  • Alternate physically demanding tasks with less demanding ones.
  • Limit the time you spend carrying heavy briefcases, purses or bags.
  • Listen to your body. Change your position often and periodically walk around and stretch your muscles.
Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
4 Physical Therapy Exercises for Lower Back Pain

4 Physical Therapy Exercises for Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain is often related to tightness in the surrounding muscles. Here are four exercises and stretches that can offer relief.

Common everyday habits, like sitting at your desk for long periods of time, can leave you with lower back pain and decreased mobility. While we recommend consulting an orthopedic specialist to rule out a serious injury, in many cases a few basic physical therapy exercises can help relieve your symptoms.

Focus on exercises that help you stretch tight muscles, as well as strengthen the torso to relieve stress on the lumbar spine. While the pain may be concentrated in the lower back, muscles connected to the area, like the hamstrings, may also be a cause of discomfort. The following exercises can help you strengthen supporting muscles and release tension in the area as a whole

1. PIRIFORMIS STRETCH

The piriformis muscle in the buttock stretches from the bottom of the spine to the femur. Piriformis tightness, especially if it irritates the nearby sciatic nerve, can cause pain that runs from the lower back all the way into the legs and feet.

To stretch this muscle, first lie flat on your back. Cross your right leg over your left, grasping your right shin with your left hand. Gently pull your right ankle over to the left side of your body and up toward your chest. Hold for 30 seconds. Then bend your left knee and bring it up toward your right leg. Grasp your left knee with your left hand and gently pull it toward your torso. You should feel this stretch in your top leg. Hold this pose for 30 seconds, and repeat with the other side. This exercise can help relieve much of the tightness that can build from sitting all day or overusing the muscle.

2. PSOAS MAJOR STRETCH

The psoas major muscle, also known as your hip flexor, connects your lower spine to the top of your thigh, and can become tight and tense if you stay seated for too long. The discomfort may manifest in your lower back as well as your hips. Symptoms of an injury can include difficulty kneeling, standing for long periods, or rising from a seated position.

To perform this stretch, lie on your back, either with your buttocks at the edge of a bed, or on the floor with a towel or foam roller beneath your lower back. You want your extended legs to be able to drop downward, if possible. Bend one knee and bring it up to your chest, pulling it gently with your hands. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds to a minute, as long as you don’t feel pain. Repeat with the other leg, and stretch each leg at least three times.

3. HAMSTRING STRETCH

The hamstrings run down the back of your thighs, from the hips to the back of the knees These muscles can easily become tight and cause discomfort in your lower back, especially if you spend eight hours a day sitting in an office chair. Performing hamstring stretches for at least 30 seconds to a minute, twice a day, can go a long way toward easing tension.

One simple stretch is the chair hamstring stretch. While standing, place the heel of one foot on a chair so that your leg makes a straight line. Bending from your hips, lean forward and reach toward your toes. Stop and hold when you feel a stretch in the back of your thigh. Then repeat with the other leg.

Alternatively, you can try a wall hamstring stretch, which allows you to lie down and avoid stress on the spine. It’s best to use a doorway where you can stretch one leg at a time, but you can also lie on your back and put both of your legs straight up on the wall at once, with your buttocks next to the wall. As you inch close to the wall and straighten your knees, you should feel the stretch in the back of your legs.

4. BIRD DOG

This mat exercise will help you strengthen and stabilize your lower back. Start on your hands and knees with your core tight and your back flat. Extend one leg behind you, with your hips level, and hold for 5-10 seconds. Then simultaneously lift your opposite arm out in front of you and hold. Repeat this 10 times for each leg, and be sure to keep your core tight and your back in position throughout.

LOWER BACK EXERCISES TO AVOID

The above exercises are an effective way to relieve lower back pain. However, there are some exercises that can make the issue worse. Touching your toes, for example, can stress the spine and overstretch your hamstrings. We also advise against doing sit-ups if you’re suffering from back pain, since they tend to actually stress the hips and put pressure on the spinal discs.

It’s best to perform the above exercises after consulting a doctor, and under the supervision of a physical therapist. Be sure to warm up and cool down when you attempt these stretches, to avoid stressing the area and causing spasms or strains. Never force the body into a position that causes pain. In some cases, back issues may be related to “inhibited” muscles, which do not respond to strengthening exercises, and may require an orthopedic specialist’s intervention.

If you’ve tried these exercises and your back pain persists or worsens, the orthopedic specialists at CompOrtho can help you rule out underlying issues and help you develop a productive healing plan.

An In-Depth Guide to Medial Knee Pain: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

An In-Depth Guide to Medial Knee Pain: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

If you’re experiencing knee pain, you may have a meniscal tear. Our orthopedic experts explain what causes this injury and what you can expect during your recovery.

The meniscus is a key cartilaginous structure in the knee joint. Pain and swelling in the medial, or inside, part of the knee can unfortunately be a sign of tearing, but your treatment options will look different depending on the type of tear, the cause, and the severity. Our guide explains meniscal injuries, and what you can expect when you visit your doctor.

WHAT IS THE MENISCUS?

The meniscus is the C-shaped, rubbery cartilage in the knee that acts as a shock absorber and stabilizer for the joint, distributing the body’s weight and providing a cushion between the femur and tibia bones. The medial meniscus is located on the inner knee, while the lateral meniscus is on the outside. Medial tears are more common, but the symptoms are the same for both injuries.

Meniscal injuries can be classified according to the “zone” of the meniscus that is affected. This allows the physician to determine the amount of blood flow available to aid in the healing process. The red zone is the outer third, which has blood vessels and is more easily repaired by the body. The red-white zone has fewer blood vessels and is less quick to heal. The inner third, the white zone, has poor blood flow and is therefore more difficult to repair.

Meniscal tears also come in a variety of shapes, which may influence the course of treatment. Common shapes include bucket-handle, flap, and radial tears, or complex combinations of the three. A tears is considered “complete” if a piece of tissue has become separated from the meniscus. Degenerative tears, which are generally caused by arthritis, are more typical of older patients. Traumatic tears are common among athletes, who often twist and turn the meniscus.

SYMPTOMS AND CAUSES OF MENISCAL TEARS

The first sign of a meniscal tear may be a “pop” in the joint, and you may continue to feel a popping or clicking sensation with movement. Although you may be able to walk on the knee at first, subsequent pain and swelling can worsen in the days that follow, especially if you continue to use the leg. For a severe tear, the knee may click, lose its full range of motion, or even give way. If a part of the meniscus comes loose, the knee can slip or even lock.

Athletes and young people are especially prone to this injury due to sports trauma or hyper-flexing the joint. A forced twist, especially when the foot is planted, may cause the meniscus to tear. Older people may experience meniscal pain due to arthritis or ordinary degenerative wear to the cartilage. In these cases the pain occurs due to gradual tearing over time, and may present with no trauma to the knee.

KNEE PAIN TREATMENT AND RECOVERY

The first course of action is to follow the rules of “RICE”: rest the knee, ice the area in 20-minute sessions, compress the area, and elevate the leg to reduce swelling. In some cases, the knee may heal with this conservative treatment, but we recommend consulting an orthopedic specialist to examine the joint and monitor your recovery. Your doctor may perform a McMurray test, which includes bending, straightening, and rotating the knee in order to determine if an MRI is necessary. Orthopedic specialists usually will not recommend surgery for older patients, but physical therapy may help you find relief within five weeks.

For younger patients, arthroscopic surgery may actually be a preferred option, as this will help preserve the cartilage and prevent early onset arthritis in the joint. This type of surgery requires only two pinhole incisions. In most cases, when the tear is in the white zone, the fragment is trimmed and the remainder smoothed. Tears in the red zone are usually repaired to retain the full benefits of a complete meniscus. Surgery is often completed in 30 minutes, followed by several days of walking with the assistance of a crutch, or possibly a brace. After a few days you can expect to return to most normal activities. Full recovery, and a return to strenuous activity, can be expected after a few weeks of physical therapy.