Is Your Hand Pain Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel or Something Else?

Is Your Hand Pain Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel or Something Else?

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) — You use your hands nearly every minute of the day, so any time they hurt it’s important to find out why.

Certain conditions can affect people who do the same hand movements for hours every day. Repetitive strain injury can cause pain in muscles, nerves and tendons. Carpal tunnel syndrome swelling compresses a key nerve. The lesser known de Quervain’s tenosynovitis typically affects tendons on the inner sides of the wrist.

An autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis often causes joint pain. Without treatment, it can lead to deformities in your hands. The wrist and finger joints are common targets of osteoarthritis, which occurs over time from normal wear-and-tear.

Treatment might start with an over-the-counter or prescription NSAID to temporarily relieve pain, but their long-term use has been linked to side effects such as liver or kidney damage and elevated heart attack risk.

Stronger medications may be needed to stop a degenerative disease like rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroid injections are an occasional option to reduce inflammation. Heat can ease stiffness while a cold pack can relieve soreness. If you have a chronic condition, an occupational therapist can teach you how to limit stress on joints when using your hands. During a flare, he or she might suggest a splint to stabilize your hand.

Sometimes surgery is needed. Dupuytren’s contracture, a thickening under the skin on the palm of the hand, can develop into firm lumps that cause fingers to bend inward. Unless lumps are removed early, it may be impossible to straighten fingers later on. If other options don’t help carpal tunnel and de Quervain’s, surgery might be the answer.

Many conditions worsen without appropriate treatment, so don’t delay in seeing your doctor or a hand specialist.

More information

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has more on painful hand conditions.

Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Is Your Hand Pain Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel or Something Else?

Is Your Hand Pain Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel or Something Else?

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) — You use your hands nearly every minute of the day, so any time they hurt it’s important to find out why.

Certain conditions can affect people who do the same hand movements for hours every day. Repetitive strain injury can cause pain in muscles, nerves and tendons. Carpal tunnel syndrome swelling compresses a key nerve. The lesser known de Quervain’s tenosynovitis typically affects tendons on the inner sides of the wrist.

An autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis often causes joint pain. Without treatment, it can lead to deformities in your hands. The wrist and finger joints are common targets of osteoarthritis, which occurs over time from normal wear-and-tear.

Treatment might start with an over-the-counter or prescription NSAID to temporarily relieve pain, but their long-term use has been linked to side effects such as liver or kidney damage and elevated heart attack risk.

Stronger medications may be needed to stop a degenerative disease like rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroid injections are an occasional option to reduce inflammation. Heat can ease stiffness while a cold pack can relieve soreness. If you have a chronic condition, an occupational therapist can teach you how to limit stress on joints when using your hands. During a flare, he or she might suggest a splint to stabilize your hand.

Sometimes surgery is needed. Dupuytren’s contracture, a thickening under the skin on the palm of the hand, can develop into firm lumps that cause fingers to bend inward. Unless lumps are removed early, it may be impossible to straighten fingers later on. If other options don’t help carpal tunnel and de Quervain’s, surgery might be the answer.

Many conditions worsen without appropriate treatment, so don’t delay in seeing your doctor or a hand specialist.

More information

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has more on painful hand conditions.

Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Health Tip: Preventing Carpal Tunnel

Health Tip: Preventing Carpal Tunnel

(HealthDay News) — Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) occurs when pressure is placed on a nerve stretching from the arm to the hand.

Often, this is due to stress on the hands and wrists. Adjusting your daily routine can help prevent CTS.

NYU Langone Health offers these suggestions:

Minimize repetitive hand movements.

Keep wrists straight.

Alternate between activities or tasks.

Avoid holding an object the same way for long periods.

Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Health Tip: Warning Signs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Health Tip: Warning Signs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the nerve that runs from the forearm to the wrist becomes squeezed or compressed.

The condition can be caused by an injury to the wrist, stress to the joint, rheumatoid arthritis, or repetitive motion of the hand and wrist.

Here are some common symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, courtesy of the U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke:

  • Numbness, burning, or tingling sensations in the fingers and/or palms of the hands.
  • Having these sensations at night, with symptoms increasing in severity and frequency.
  • Fingers feeling weak or swollen, even with no visible swelling.
  • Weak grip.
  • Difficulty perceiving hot and cold.
Copyright ©2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Too Much or Too Little Weight May Worsen Rheumatoid Arthritis

Too Much or Too Little Weight May Worsen Rheumatoid Arthritis

Obesity may accelerate and amplify the crippling symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.

Conversely, the researchers also found that unexplained weight loss might also signal problems for these patients, because it could mean that they’re at greater risk for disability.

“While patients and rheumatologists may be focused mostly on disease activity, we should also consider this common condition [obesity], which can contribute to problems that are usually attributed to the arthritis itself,” said study author Dr. Joshua Baker.

“In addition, unintentional weight loss should alert us that the patient may be becoming frail and is at risk for developing new disability,” he added. Baker is an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition. It develops when immune cells that normally fight germs attack the lining of the joints, or cartilage. This causes the joints to swell and the surrounding bones, ligaments and muscles to gradually erode. Rheumatoid arthritis worsens over time, often leading to disability.

For the study, Baker and his colleagues looked at the effects of obesity on the progression of rheumatoid arthritis in just over 25,000 people with the disease.

The investigators found that the disease advanced more quickly among those who were very obese. This was true regardless of the level of inflammation in their joints.

In addition, people who were thin but lost weight without trying also became disabled more quickly.

The study was published April 30 in the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

“So, this study suggests that patients with rheumatoid arthritis and obesity would benefit from intentional weight loss through a comprehensive management strategy,” Baker said in a journal news release.”

“However, when we see that someone is losing weight without trying, it’s probably a poor prognostic sign, especially if they are already thin,” he added.

Although the study could not prove a cause-and-effect link, the researchers suggested that new treatments and strategies to help people maintain a healthy weight might help prevent disability among people with rheumatoid arthritis.

And, Baker’s team noted, the findings could help doctors recognize signs of frailty among their rheumatoid arthritis patients who may benefit from strength training and physical therapy.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about obesity and rheumatoid arthritis.

SOURCE: Arthritis Care & Research, news release, April 30, 2018

4 in 10 People Will Suffer Arthritic Hands Over Lifetime

4 in 10 People Will Suffer Arthritic Hands Over Lifetime

If you have stiff, aching fingers and hands, you’re not alone — a new study reports that 40 percent of people will be affected by the pain of arthritis in at least one hand.

The rate seen in the new research is “just slightly below the percentage of osteoarthritis seen in knees and is significantly greater than that seen in hips,” noted Dr. Daniel Polatsch. He’s co-director of the New York Hand & Wrist Center at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Arthritis “affects hand strength and function and causes difficulty doing activities of daily living,” Polatsch said.

The study team was led by Jin Qin, of the Arthritis Program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The researchers looked at 1999-2010 data on more than 2,200 people from North Carolina. All people in the study were aged 45 or older.

The information collected included symptoms the participants reported as well as hand X-rays.

Women were at higher risk than men, with nearly half of women (47 percent) developing hand arthritis. Only about a quarter of men had hand arthritis, Qin’s team said. Whites were more prone to the ailment than blacks, with rates of 41 percent and 29 percent, respectively.

Excess weight was also a risk factor for hand arthritis. Lifetime risk among obese people was 47 percent, compared to 36 percent for non-obese people, the study found.

Dr. Steven Carsons is chief of rheumatology at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. He said the finding that hand arthritis is more common in women “has been long thought to have a genetic and hormonal basis.”

The obesity link is more intriguing, Carsons said.

“While obesity has always been assumed to be a risk factor for osteoarthritis of weight-bearing joints, such as the knee, these data reveal the somewhat surprising association of obesity and lifetime risk of development of hand osteoarthritis,” he said.

Recent studies have suggested that obesity may set up “systemic inflammation” in the body, Carsons said, which may raise the odds of arthritis in a non-weight-bearing joint, such as the hand.

Because arthritis in the hands can be disabling, Polatsch said, “treatment options and access to hand specialists need to improve in order to minimize the impact of this potentially disabling condition in our aging population.”

The study was published May 4 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

More information

Find out more about arthritis at the Arthritis Foundation.